Introducing C&TH’s 50 Finest Interior Designers 2022

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Meet our judges' top picks

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Drum roll, please… Read on to discover which names are lighting up the British design world in 2022, as decided by our panel of pioneers from the worlds of eco design and sustainability, fashion, tech and architecture. The 50 Finest Interior Designers 2022 were chosen by Edeline Lee, Harriet Wetton, Jay Blades MBE and Richard Parr. Words by Emma Love.

Meet the 50 Finest Interior Designers Judging Panel 2022

50 Finest Interior Designers 2022

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2LG Studios - 50 Finest Interior Designers

2LG Studio

Founded by a pair of former actors-turned-interior-designers, Jordan Cluroe and Russell Whitehead, 2LG Studio (or Two Lovely Gays, as they are known to their friends), describe their trademark style as joyful minimalism. ‘We believe that the two extremes – minimalism and colour and pattern – are not mutually exclusive,’ confirms Russell. The duo began by creating and screen-printing their own fabrics, which they sold at Greenwich Market, before officially setting up their practice in 2014 after Jordan was runner-up in BBC Two’s Great Interior Design Challenge (they are currently filming the second series of Changing Rooms). Their aim is to tell stories within a space and help clients express themselves through design. Favourite material? ‘We’ve been using Smile Plastics for years. It’s a small company that recycles waste and sea plastics. We put it in one of our most celebrated bathrooms and people often think its terrazzo.’ 2lgstudio.com

1508 London - 50 Finest Interior Designers

1508 London

‘If we analyse the common threads in all our work, they would be quality of materials, attention to detail and immersing ourselves in the local vernacular and culture,’ explains Hamish Brown, partner at 1508 London which, over the last 12 years, has expanded into an 80-strong global team. ‘We take a holistic approach and strive for balance: elegance and comfort, function and meaning, nature and technology.’ Current commercial jobs include The Raffles Residences at The OWO and the Cipriani Residences in Miami; private commissions range from villas in France to penthouses in Athens. ‘Our job is to create spaces that respond to a client’s lifestyle. For instance, at a recent property in London, the entrance lobby was key so we used materials such as stone and marble, and soft lighting, to bring a sense of arrival.’ 1508london.com

Abbie de Bunsen - 50 Finest Interior Designers

Abbie De Bunsen

‘I am slightly obsessed with all colour but at the moment I am working with a lot of green, which gives such a fresh, interesting feel when mixed tonally,’ says Abbie de Bunsen, who launched her eponymous Balham-based design studio over a decade ago. Her aim is always to ‘create memorable spaces that are a joy to be in,’ with small, surprise details that encourage lingering. Favourite past projects include a house for a family who were relocating from Paris to London and bringing with them an impressive art collection, and the new Belgravia atelier for fashion designer Anna Mason. ‘Working with another creative from a different discipline was a delight, and made the process very organic and energetic,’ she recalls. ‘Translating Anna’s brand and style of fashion into an interior language was fascinating. We sourced antiques, and designed furniture and bespoke rugs around a monogram created from ribbons.’ abbiedebunsen.com

Adeko & Co

Adeko & Co

For Nigerian-born, London-based Tolù Adèkó, design runs in the family. ‘I come from four generations who worked in the Lagos textiles industry,’ he says, citing the late Sir Terence Conran as a mentor during his teens. His African heritage is inspiring two in-progress restaurants in Tangier. ‘I love to collaborate with local artisans so I’m having chairs upholstered with traditional aso oke woven textiles.’ Although his practice was established in 2014, it was put on hold while he did stints at other interior design firms (including David Collins Studio). His experience ranges from hotels and cruise ships to an island resort in the Bahamas. Now he is taking on commissions under his own name again and has recently completed a duplex apartment in north London. ‘The client wanted something that was fun and quirky, that he could fill with his own collection of Japanese and Chinese art. I used detailing such as brass inlays and hand-blown glass lights. I am passionate about longevity in design and creating spaces that last the test of time.’ adeko.co

Albion Nord

Albion Nord

Set up in 2017 by four directors – Ottalie Stride, Camilla Clarke, Anthony Kooperman and Ben Johnson – who all met while working at Candy & Candy, Albion Nord’s aim is to ‘create authentic and timeless spaces that are built on history and context.’ Natural materials such as linens, pippy oaks, plasters and sisals play a significant role in their interiors (‘Kentia palms or figs are great for large spaces,’ says Camilla); another go-to is the use of antiques to add depth and character. ‘Some of our greatest desgin infleunces range from the Georgian period through to the architect John Nash and the Japanese wabi-sabi aesthetic found in the work of Axel Vervoordt. Both of which value balance, simplicity and honety in materiality,’ she continues. Recently completed residences include Benham Park, a Grade II-listed stately home in Berkshire and two Chelsea Barracks townhouses. albion-nord.com

Atelier NM

Atelier NM

‘The Atelier NM approach is very much human- centred and intuitive,’ says founder Najwa Mroue, whose personal design journey is influenced by her childhood growing up in Lebanon and the Czech Republic. ‘We start by asking a client what story they want to tell and how they want to feel. Our designs are adventurous and full of soul. Also, scale is imperative: there has to be a hierarchy within a space. Too many “wows” in one room create needless drama.’ Often, she will use a single prominent hue or statement material (antique brass is a current favourite), which is then grounded with quieter, thoughtful details – whether a set of bespoke shelves to display an owner’s vintage treasures or somewhere for an existing collection of art to shine. ‘London is our inspiration right now but everything influences me; it’s a curse of being a designer, but also a blessing,’ she concludes. atelier-nm.com

Beata Heuman

Beata Heuman

‘I want to create environments that bring out the best in people. That make them feel relaxed, happy, comfortable and inspired,’ says Swedish- born Beata Heuman who opened her studio in 2013 after a nine-year spell working for Nicky Haslam. ‘Spaces should look beautiful but it’s equally important that they are a true reflection of human nature, which to me is a great mix of different and sometimes contradictory influences.’ She is known for her offbeat palettes (of-the-moment choices include buttery yellow, rustic linens, mohair and pine), playful detailing and often adding a surprise otherworldly element. ‘Not knowing quite what to expect makes you more observant to your surroundings. It encourages you to think about the room you are in, so you are more present in the moment,’ she confirms. A Josef Frank villa in the south of Sweden, a boutique hotel in Paris and a Scottish estate are all on the go. beataheuman.com

Ben Pentreath

Ben Pentreath

Ben Pentreath’s architectural and interior design studio works on every scale, from large new urban developments such as Poundbury – the Duchy of Cornwall’s pioneering urban extension to Dorchester where some of the houses are based on Georgian examples in Weymouth – to individual private residences. Most recently, the latter has included the decoration of a new coastal home on Jersey, a manor house in Oxfordshire and a residence in Vienna. This decorating side of the business is renowned for its playful style influenced by historical interiors of all periods (including the English practitioners of the 1960s and 70s), but infused with a fresh, modern sensibility. Ben is also co-owner of furniture, lighting and homewares shop Pentreath & Hall (which he set up with decorative artist Bridie Hall more than a decade ago), and has a new monograph on the work of the practice in the pipeline. benpentreath.com

Bernard Interiors

Bernard Interiors

With commissions ranging from a contemporary renovation of a Victorian villa, which incorporates a purpose-built structure for a collection of vintage Porsches, to several Audley Villages developments aimed at redefining what senior living looks like, there’s no doubt that Bernard Interiors has a broad remit. ‘We tend to start with the architectural elements of a space and create layers that consider scale, light, colour, texture and pattern,’ explains Jen Bernard, who founded the Newcastle-based studio in 2008. ‘First impressions count for a lot when you walk into a room and we aim to get a balance of all these elements to create a successful scheme.’ Classic neutral linens and grass cloth wall coverings, leathers, velvets, and muted tones such as olive green and earthy brown are all staples. ‘We also love to use curved shapes and geometric patterns to add interest,’ continues Jen, who is a big believer in the ‘buy well, buy once’ philosophy of design. bernardinteriors.co.uk

Campbell Rey

Campbell-Rey

Duncan Campbell and Charlotte Rey set up their joint studio in 2014, and since then have made their name with rich, tactile spaces: ‘We are a glass half-full practice so we love colour and often juxtapose materials,’ says Duncan, citing a walnut burr with polished steel detail, or a lapis lazuli inlay that plays against a tapestry wall as examples. They often include little details for clients to discover over time too – whether it’s a jib door or a hidden bar cabinet. ‘We work with our network of decorative painters to create trompe l’oeil moments or illusions of perspective to change the perception of volume in a space. Specialist techniques like églomisé glass, mosaic work, marquetry and fabric wallcoverings are also very exciting for us as they give a new expression to traditional crafts,’ continues Charlotte. Keeping them busy is the renovation of a Belle Époque villa near San Remo, the restoration of a Beaux Arts villa in Cap d’Antibes and their ongoing furniture collaboration with design gallery The Invisible Collection. campbell-rey.com

Carden Cunietti

Carden Cunietti

Over the last two years, Audrey Carden and Eleanora Cunietti – who teamed up in 1996 and originally ran a homeware shop in Notting Hill together – haven’t let the pandemic slow them down, taking on 40 projects that are now at various stages of completion. These include an Art Deco house in Jersey, an estate in Virginia that was once home to Jackie Kennedy and JFK, and a new build in Antigua. ‘We are always led by our client’s needs, be it a request for a place of calm refuge or somewhere glamorous to entertain, but a welcoming space should make you want to stay longer,’ says Eleanora. ‘Our interiors tend to involve lots of texture, combinations of wood, stone, fabulous fabrics and custom-designed pieces.’ On their design mood boards now are several quite different palettes: neutral tones with texture and deep jewel colours with a hint of Deco. carden-cunietti.com

Cave Interiors - 50 Finest Interior Designers

Cave Interiors

Led by Creative Director and Founder Georgina Cave and her daughter Anouska, Primrose Hill- based Cave Interiors is a small but busy studio with 10 projects on the go, from an Arts & Crafts house in Hampstead to a new-build on the Scottish coast and a converted barn in the Cotswolds. ‘A typical Cave interior will be rich in its use of colour and pattern, and more often than not feature antique pieces,’ explains Georgina. ‘Reuse is at the forefront of our minds and wherever possible, this is something that we like to incorporate – whether through vintage lighting, furniture or textiles.’ Reclaimed zellige tiles, salvaged timber and unlacquered brass are also recurring themes. ‘We use soft lighting, textural rugs, thoughtfully placed pieces of furniture and art to draw you in, set the tone and create a sense of enveloping warmth.’ caveinteriors.com

Clare Gaskin

Clare Gaskin Interiors

A Clare Gaskin interior is characterised by creativity, practicality and inspiration taken from nature. ‘Our role is to create a home that tells a story – revealing itself room by room,’ explains the designer, who left a career at Sotheby’s to set up her eponymous studio in 2009. Experimentation is not something she shies away from, whether using fabric made from recycled bottle tops, reupholstering an existing piece of furniture for a new lease of life, or reframing (and possibly restoring) a beloved artwork. ‘We prioritise using UK-based suppliers, which usually includes finding incredibly talented craftsman and artisans to work with,’ she adds, citing a family home in Balham inspired by Parisian style, and townhouse in Marylebone as projects set to be completed by the studio this year. claregaskin.com

Eadie & Crole

Eadie & Crole

Sophie Eadie and Fi Crole joined forces in 2019 (the former previously worked on houses with her property developer husband, the latter has worked at, among others, Veere Grenney and Joanna Wood), bonding over their shared love of timeless interiors. ‘We like to create homes that are comfortable, and classic with a modern twist,’ says Sophie, of the pair’s ongoing commissions which include a Grade II-listed London townhouse, a farmhouse in the south of England and a château in France. ‘Our trademark touches are in the everyday details. For instance, contrast binding that introduces more colour or texture to upholstery and curtains.’ They collaborate with British craftsmen as much as possible to create bespoke pieces and always have in their minds a tip from the late Roger Banks-Pye, a former interior design decorator at Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler, ‘Each room requires, whether large or small, something black; this helps to ground all other colours in the space.’ eadieandcrole.com

Elicyon

Elicyon

Flow of space and scale are both crucial aspects of designing for trained architect Charu Gandhi, who founded Elicyon eight years ago and is known for her opulent tailored interiors (past career defining moments include waving her wand over private apartments in Clarges Mayfair and several spaces at the landmark Chelsea Barracks development). ‘Creating a joyful environment for our clients is at the heart of our endeavours. Ultimately, I always ask, can someone live their authentic life here?’ she says. ‘I particularly love creating a rhythm within each room, giving a hint for what lies further, through a common tonality, approach to form or sequence.’ The geometry and placement of furniture, lighting and contrasts are always key considerations. For instance, in a recent Belgravia penthouse, she juxtaposed dark tones of blackened bronze detailing with a neutral base and accents of raspberry pink, blues and greens. elicyon.com

Elnaz Namaki

Elnaz Namaki

Iranian roots, an English upbringing and working for Bruno Moinard in Paris have all contributed to Elnaz Namaki’s way of cohesively combining different styles and eras. ‘Signature touches are the use of warm lighting, bronze accents and clean lines,’ says Elnaz who often teams up with HvB Development to offer a complete design and build service. ‘We also like to mix old and new, with vintage pieces where possible; use natural materials in earth tones; and add colour, textures and patterns in soft furnishings.’ She has recently completed a stucco villa in Kensington with a focus on traditional architectural detailing, a cosy second home in Holland Park and a bachelor pad in Chelsea featuring dark joinery and monochromatic colours. Her current inspiration includes historical designers such as Alberto Pinto and François Catroux, feng shui principles and expressionist art while her furniture collection, Luuna, is based on mid-century modern forms. elnaznamaki.com

Francis Sultana

Francis Sultana

A go-to interior designer for serious art collectors, Francis Sultana’s clients appreciate his ability to merge the practicalities of a residential space with often large-scale visual paintings, sculpture and installation pieces. His atelier produces annual collections of bespoke and limited- edition furniture and textiles (it is in the same building as the David Gill Gallery in St James’s, of which he is artistic director): ‘My furniture, which features bespoke upholstery and patinated bronze, is, I suppose, the foundation of all my interiors, as well as the accessories I design like rugs and lighting. My collaborations with artists are also very much part of what my work is about. I use texture a lot, from woven tweeds in upholstery to woods, and I like to let these elements come to the foreground,’ he says. His biggest news this year is the opening of Hotel La Palma in Capri and he is starting work on the Corinthia Palace hotel in his native Malta. francissultana.com

french brook interiors

French-Brooks Interiors

Relaunched by Victoria Wormsley as French-Brooks Interiors in 2017 (she bought out Chester Row Interiors from her property development partners), the studio’s roster spans anything from an old monastery in the south of France to a contemporary new build in the capital. ‘Our underlying values are that the space is well laid out and lit before we think about decorative schemes. The end result needs to be elegant but also comfortable and individual,’ says Victoria. ‘I dislike anything too trend driven which will date quickly, or anything so ostentatious that it’s intimidating.’ Lighting designs are produced in-house so are incorporated from the start, and she loves using textured wall coverings such as grasscloth to add subtle interest and offset artwork. This season, she is favouring bolder colours such as emerald green and citrus yellow on painted furniture and fabrics, and swapping stone for porcelain in bathrooms. french-brooks.com

goddard littlefair

Goddard Littlefair

From Gleneagles in Scotland to The Mayfair Townhouse in London, Goddard Littlefair – aka Martin Goddard and Jo Littlefair – are behind some of the UK’s top hotels. Uniting the duo is a belief in ‘listening to the soul of a property and its location to articulate a narrative with integrity.’ The pair are also conscious of their impact on the planet’s resources and see part of their contribution as ‘raising the conversation of sustainable materiality, be that by sourcing products which perhaps had a previous life or insisting on raw materials that can be replenished,’ says Jo, listing a penthouse at Belvedere Gardens and The Conrad residence at 9 Millbank as a flavour of recent commissions. ‘However, our attitude to sustainability is to expect a high-quality finish from the materials, so sustainable shouldn’t automatically mean rustic.’ goddardlittlefair.com

helen green

Helen Green Design

Founded two decades ago by the late Helen Green, this design studio is renowned for its considered, understated take on interiors. ‘We focus on specialist craftsmanship and championing British design,’ says Creative Lead Alexandra Jurkiewicz, who joined the company three years ago. ‘We are proud to say that most of our sourcing is done in the UK and comes from specialist artisans and suppliers; each project we take on must embody the same pursuit of excellence, meticulous attention to detail and perfection.’ The studio recently worked on a duplex Grade II-listed apartment in Knightsbridge and a modern villa in Vienna. ‘The setting of each could not be further apart in terms of architecture and location. Completed almost at the same time, it was fascinating to see how our core values resulted in creating two completely different yet extraordinary interiors, beautifully telling the story of their surroundings.’ helengreendesign.com

Howark Design

Howark Design

‘Saskia has a bit of a superpower for picking the right colour for spaces,’ says James Arkoulis, referring to his Howark Design co-founder Saskia Howard. ‘Our signature style is colourful and characterful: we work with clients to create homes that have a warm and welcoming feel. We are also not too precious in our approach – these are homes to be lived in.’ The pair also put an emphasis on local materials and like to collaborate with British artisans to create one-off pieces. ‘One especially memorable commission was a beautiful Nakashima-style coffee table created by joining two hand-picked pieces of chestnut that came from within a few miles of the client’s home; we know it will become an heirloom for the family,’ continues James. Current projects include a coastal pad in West Sussex, a Chelsea pied à terre and an Edwardian country retreat. howark-design.co.uk

Janine Stone

Janine Stone & Co

Exceptional homes without exception – that’s the simple premise Janine Stone’s eponymous design studio was founded on (her husband Gideon is managing director). ‘The way we compose our designs in a highly curated manner is our signature,’ says Janine, who is working on a new build on Surrey’s Wentworth Estate, a full refurbishment of a listed country house in Cambridgeshire, and an estate in Yorkshire. ‘Our projects are always a tailored response to our clients, their personalities and lifestyles. Someone’s art collection, favourite holiday destinations, fashion tastes or how they like to socialise might all feed into the inspiration.’ The secret to a welcoming space? ‘Good lighting. It’s important because it either creates a monotonous impression or makes you stop and not want to leave. When someone enters a room, it’s the lighting that welcomes them, energises them, comforts them – or at worst depresses them.’ janinestone.com

Katharine Pooley - 50 finest interior designers

Katharine Pooley

‘The essence of the Katharine Pooley design ethos is the balance of evocative beauty and an original viewpoint with effortless comfort and luxury,’ explains the interior designer. ‘I am always pushing my 47-strong team to be bold, unique and daring.’ Works in progress include a yacht, a beach villa in Sardinia and a château 700 feet above the Mediterranean overlooking the bay of Cannes. ‘It is of large historical importance and a rare jewel of a project,’ says Katharine of the latter. ‘I am so thrilled to be overseeing its redesign, especially as this is where my favourite actress Grace Kelly filmed To Catch a Thief.’ She has always found the natural world a great source of inspiration and spending time on the French coast has been no exception. ‘Being there is encouraging me to use organic, natural textures like timber and stone, as well as soft woven fabrics such as linen, cashmere and wools. Visiting some exquisite French gardens has also influenced me.’ katharinepooley.com

Laura Hammett

Laura Hammett

Renowned for her understated and authentic interiors, Laura Hammett first and foremost designs around how a client wants a home to feel. ‘Our signature palette is warm and neutral, highlighted with metal touches and rich, sumptuous fabrics; I just love the contrast of plush fabric and warm metal together,’ she says. The Fulham studio, which she runs with her husband Aaron, is splitting its time between working on a penthouse apartment in the Bahamas, two villas in the Middle East and a pair of family homes in Surrey – one of which includes an entertainment floor with a car show garage and a golf simulation room. ‘For us, the most important aspect of designing a room is that it is as useable as it is beautiful. The ultimate luxury is when every single thing has been considered so that living is absolutely seamless.’ laurahammett.com

Linda Boronkay

Linda Boronkay

She is perhaps best known for her role as former Design Director of Soho House, but two years ago Linda Boronkay founded her own studio to create ‘spaces which are deeply personal and have meaning. I love it when you walk into a party and can guess who the host is from the style of the home,’ says Linda, who has just completed a hotel near Sydney and is in the midst of installing a private family club in Madrid which includes a library, bar, yoga studio, spa and basement screening room. ‘We created a series of bespoke lights, furniture and rugs with local craftspeople, and sourced many of the vintage items in markets in Italy and Spain,’ she says of the latter. ‘The colours are vibrant and the textiles tactile; we used marble and tiles and worked closely with our clients who come from fashion and architecture backgrounds.’ lindaboronkay.com

Linley

Linley

Michael Keech and Graham Green have been in charge of the interior design division at Linley for the last four years, lending an architecture-first slant to the company’s often vast projects (over 50,000 sq/ft). The pair recently completed two country houses: one a new build in the Baroque style, the other a moated, medieval pad with handsome neoclassical additions. Now, they are tackling a historic residential building in the Far East and apartments on the world’s largest private yacht, the Njord Ocean Residences. ‘The biggest consideration is the client and what they would like to get from the space. Are they out to impress or are they after comfort and cosiness? Do they have a large collection of art or a grand piano that need to be housed perfectly? These are the questions we ask.’ davidlinley.com

Martin Brudnizki Design Studio

Martin Brudnizki Design Studio

A party pad in Austin designed to be a surrealist take on Texas; a contemporary country house with traditional details in Lahore; and a bungalow in West Hollywood overlooking Chateau Marmont with a mid-century Italian feel… these are just some of the diverse residences on Martin Brudnizki Design Studio’s roll-call. Of course, he’s best known for putting his distinct stamp on bars, retail spaces and members’ clubs around the world (including Scott’s and Annabel’s in London and several Costes-owned hotspots in Paris) but whether he’s designing a home or for hospitality, context and the client always come first. That and light, which he believes is the most important consideration when designing a room. ‘Both how the natural light fills the space and the ambient light in the evenings. Not only to make the room look good but the people in it; it’s a bit like a stage set.’ mbds.com

Martin Hulbert

Martin Hulbert Designs

Martin Hulbert and Jay Grierson are best known for traditional country house hotels with a contemporary twist – such as The Grove in Hertfordshire and The Grove of Narberth in Pembrokeshire, where they have just completed the latest phase of work. ‘It is everything other than what you would expect a hotel interior to be,’ confirms Jay of the refresh. The long-established design duo have also been turning their attention to various residential properties too. Most recently this meant remodelling a seven-bedroom Greek island villa, creating a house for living and entertaining on a grand scale in Regent’s Park, London, and working on a 14-bedroom holiday home on a private estate in Italy. ‘We like our spaces to look and feel deeply comfortable, to have a personality that reflects the owner’s taste as well as our own need for perfection,’ he concludes. martinhulbertdesign.com

Martin Kemp Design

Martin Kemp Design

Martin Kemp has long been on speed dial for the super prime market – which means his extensive output ranges from jets and superyachts to jaw-dropping private residences. ‘Our workload has the usual levels of diversity,’ he says. ‘For instance, we have three houses in Switzerland, several classical mansions in London, a multi-unit development in Monaco, a sub-penthouse in the Bahamas, a yacht in Italy and a vast apartment in New York on the go. We love the variety of styles these projects allow us to embrace, everything from rural calm to urban chic, from charming to sophisticated.’ For Martin, positioning furniture to take maximum advantage of the space is always a major consideration as is ‘how one enters, where does one place keys, which are the strongest views to soak up, how best to locate artwork… combining these aspects with the architectural restrictions one sometimes encounters can be a challenge, albeit a stimulating one.’ martinkempdesign.com

MHZ London

Mlinaric, Henry and Zervudachi

Founded in 1964 by David Mlinaric, MHZ first became known for working on important London and country houses, often in association with The National Trust. Now, it’s an international set-up with a trio of offices (London, Paris, New York) that both collaborate and take on briefs separately, and a portfolio that spans ski chalets, yachts and houses in far-flung destinations such as Mustique and New Delhi. ‘The attention to architectural detail is what drives our design process,’ says Tino Zervudachi, who oversees two of the studios. ‘We try to make spaces look as unforced as possible. We also believe in exceptional art to elevate an interior from good to great. And in making sure the house functions well, which we do by getting the layouts and detailing right.’ The result is refined and harmonious, achieved through a sympathetic use of colour as well as clever combinations of antique and modern furniture. mhzlondon.com

Natalia Myar - 50 Finest Interior Designers

Natalia Miyar

A trained architect and former design director at Helen Green Design, Natalia Miyar set up her studio in 2016 and has since become known for her tactile interiors, where materiality is equally important as colour and pattern. ‘My spaces are likely to show a confident use of colour; I’m not afraid to make strong statements through bold and vibrant pattern choices, but overall, I want my schemes to be elegant and balanced,’ explains Natalia, who cites an apartment in Belgravia, inspired by Manhattan living, where she combined geometric patterns, soft textures and bespoke joinery, as an example. ‘I want people to enjoy using the homes I create which is why I consider all the senses when I’m making my materials selection. In terms of style, I am guided by location, the client’s lifestyle and the architecture. What works for one client may not for another but these guiding principles are present in all my work.’ nataliamiyar.com

Nina Campbell

‘The Covid years have been quite productive really,’ reflects interiors doyenne Nina Campbell, in what sounds like something of an understatement. She has been juggling briefs that include the exclusive women-only Alexandra Club in Melbourne, updating a palatial home for a member of Jordan’s royal family and a house in Maine which features a private pub. ‘We’re currently doing the bedrooms at The Alexandra; it’s all been long distance but with the advantage of having visited immediately before the pandemic. We’ve tried to maximise the space and make each one as cheerful and inviting as possible, with everything you might need.’ Whatever she’s designing, in social areas the seating plan and making sure that guests aren’t marooned is always at the front of her mind. ‘I’m constantly going round rooms making sure the tables are in the right place and the light is coming in where I want it.’ ninacampbell.com

Olivia Outred

Olivia Outred Studio

Olivia Outred’s first experience of working in the industry was under interior decorator Philip Hooper at Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler. ‘Philip instilled in me the importance of graceful spatial planning, balance, and classical furniture arrangements,’ recalls Olivia, who also headed up the interior design side of Lulu Lytle’s Soane before opening her own studio in 2014. ‘My signature style is very much linked to those lessons, but with the addition of the odd contemporary piece of furniture and some offbeat colour choices.’ She often creates bespoke furniture, mirrors and lighting for clients; describes herself as a colour enthusiast; and loves materials such as plaster and gesso that are ‘clean, white and uplifting. We are also using split cane a lot, which is fantastic and very decorative.’ A Georgian property in Edinburgh, a pair of bachelor pads in Notting Hill and a private members’ club in the Cotswolds are all in progress. oliviaoutred.com

Pandora Taylor

Pandora Taylor

‘Rather than throw everything at a space, I usually champion one big wow and then layer everything around it to ensure it doesn’t feel over the top. I want my interiors to be fun but also sophisticated,’ says Pandora Taylor, who started out working in auction houses before retraining at KLC School of Design. A job at Kitesgrove followed; then she set up her studio in 2018. She often designs one-off pieces of furniture for clients, some of which are sold through her website. ‘My headboards in particular have become a signature, with bold and often asymmetric outlines that challenge our ideas on traditional furniture shapes.’ She doesn’t shy away from out-of-the-box hues either: ‘the way we experience colours can literally change the way we feel and have a profound effect on the way we live. They should be enriching and uplifting, whether the aim is to create a moody, or bright and airy atmosphere.’ pandorataylor.co.uk

Pringle & Pringle - 50 Finest Interior Designers

Pringle & Pringle

Architect-trained Sophie Pringle began her career at Turner Pocock before founding her studio seven years ago. Threaded through every scheme is her belief that good design has the power to enhance wellbeing. ‘This philosophy underpins every step of our creative process, providing the foundations on which we create our clients’ dream homes,’ says Sophie, who is working on a new build on the Isle of Arran, a listed house in Petworth and a Queen Anne home in Suffold. ‘We look at each property holistically to ensure that all requirements are met, sometimes changing room uses or tweaking internal layouts, before approaching each space with colour psychology to create the appropriate energy or feel.’ Bespoke joinery appears in nearly all her interiors, she especially loves designing bedrooms for children, and typically layers patterns and colours wherever she can. pringleandpringle.co.uk

rachel Chudley

Rachel Chudley

Having studied both art and interior design, it’s no wonder that Rachel Chudley is known for her artsy, whimsical schemes. ‘I want to bring joy into the everyday with unexpected design that aims to delight,’ she says. ‘Interiors and art should both be an extension of your personality. My clients often spend time at a gallery with me and we visit artists’ studios together.’ She employs both artists and designers at her practice and always uses custom paint shades created by The Rachel Colour Studio in collaboration with renowned colour consultant, Donald Kaufman (green, she says, is making a big appearance on her mood boards). She has just completed her first home in America: a 1980s Manhattan apartment that she transformed with a ‘modern Baroque tableau of texture and colour. The expressive decoration drew on the client’s love of spectacle and collection of kimono-inspired silk robes’. rachelchudley.com

salvesen graham

Salvesen Graham

Nicole Salvesen and Mary Graham focus on creating classically beautiful and carefully curated schemes that feel comfortable and stylish – often incorporating antiques (either sourced specifically or family heirlooms), as well as colour and pattern, to ‘inject a fresh, sometimes playful sense to an interior’. For a home in Mayfair, for instance, they are reinstating the original architectural details as well as creating some new and exciting ones, such as a curved cantilevered staircase. They are also revamping several country houses – an Arts & Crafts home in Hampshire, an Edwardian rectory in Sussex, and a Queen Anne house in Buckinghamshire – and launching their first wallpaper and fabric collection, based on historic patterns that have been reimagined. ‘They encapsulate the Salvesen Graham Future Heritage aesthetic and have been designed to complement all furniture and accessories in The Collection by Salvesen Graham,’ says Nicole. salvesengraham.com

Samantha Todhunter

Samantha Todhunter Design

Samantha Todhunter aims to create interiors ‘suffused with an easy, modern glamour; laidback chic underpinned with traditional flourishes’ – whether it’s a major reworking of a 16th century farmhouse with a hyper modern extension or an overhaul of a tired family home. For the latter, the team combined handsome furniture with plays on pattern and texture. ‘The house was grounded by a caramel toffee colour with flashes of red,’ says Samantha. ‘We used an interesting map of hard materials throughout, from backlit onyx to waxy parquetry panels, rough jute and silk carpets.’ She believes that layering is a must for adding interest, depth and warmth. ‘I love the sort of juxtaposition that makes you stop and ask yourself why a fabric works. They might be prints that shouldn’t really sit together in any typical sense but in actual fact, they just look right.’ samanthatodhunter.com

Sara Cosgrave - 50 Finest Interior Designers

Sara Cosgrave Studio

County Mayo-native Sara Cosgrove cut her teeth working at Helen Green Design and Candy & Candy before being appointed Head of Interior Design at Harrods. In 2014, she set out on her own and now works on all scales, from apartment developments to members-only wellness clubs and, recently, a schoolhouse turned residential beach escape. ‘Our style is tailored, tonal and timeless,’ says Sara, who also spent several years as Design Director of The Principal Hotel Company, overseeing the interiors of properties such as the Kimpton Fitzroy in London. For Sara, schemes often hang around a single showpiece: ‘on one project we discovered two aquamarine upholstered vintage shell chairs and the whole interior evolved from there.’ Details that often  appear in greater or lesser amounts include ‘old maps and the colour blue. I also love introducing vintage and antique pieces into a crisp, contemporary space.’ saracosgrove.com

Shalini Misra

Shalini Misra

‘Our work brings aesthetic integrity together with well- executed spatial design,’ says trained architect Shalini Misra. ‘This approach tends to deliver homes that not only look beautiful, but also function properly.’ Using materials in interesting ways, curating collections of art and design, and prioritising wellness are all characteristic of the practice. ‘Enabling wellness is crucial to our work and our aim is to achieve this in any project. Our immediate surroundings are so important to feel our best, so this is front of mind through the whole process,’ she says. ‘We design around natural light and air flow, maximising the relationship between indoors and outdoors wherever possible, and integrating clever technology that aids productivity, health and relaxation.’ She is working on a historic former museum in New York that is being converted into a 20,000 sq/ft home, a traditional Yali house on the Bosporus in Istanbul and a triplex penthouse in Mumbai. shalinimisra.com

Colefax & Fowler - 50 Finest Interior Designers

Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler

The longest established interior decorating firm in the UK, Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler has been synonymous with the English country house aesthetic for nearly a century. This pioneering approach – effortlessly mixing old with new, and luxurious with humble – is today interpreted by seven decorators (all supported by an architectural interior designer) who are as experienced working on modern city apartments as they are updating historic buildings. ‘We combine the clients’ needs with respect for the architecture of the building and create spaces that are serene and comfortable but nonetheless exciting,’ explains Chairman Wendy Nicholls of the practice’s portfolio, which ranges from a ranch in America to ski chalets in Europe and beach houses in the Caribbean. ‘Half the fun of being an interior designer is helping extract from people their view of themselves and bringing that to life.’ sibylcolefax.com

Sims Hilditch

Sims Hilditch

Known for her elegant English style, Emma Sims-Hilditch has perfected the knack of creating layered spaces that feel lived in. ‘Antiques are always included in our designs; they add such gravitas and work well in both contemporary and more traditional homes,’ she says. ‘Heavy lined curtains, pretty floral fabrics and statement art are also key.’ As are natural materials such as linen, which she uses for everything from window treatments to wallpaper. ‘In terms of colour, we are currently enjoying yellow. A sunny yellow like Farrow & Ball’s Babouche is one of our favourites.’ The team has recently installed the first phase of an 18th century family home near Winchester. ‘The design was led by the countryside views. We knocked down an existing extension and worked with an architect to replace it with a more in keeping brickwork design. Sliding doors connect the property to the garden, framing the landscape beyond.’ simshilditch.com

Space Shack

Space Shack

Led by architect- trained Omar Bhatti, this small but ambitious six-year-old East London studio tackles all sorts of projects from quirky makeovers to full-scale refurbishments. He understands the importance of maximising every square inch of space. Meanwhile, a leaning towards a minimalist aesthetic and unassuming materials results in fresh, relatable interiors. ‘Natural materials and tonal schemes with pops of colour are my thing right now,’ he says. ‘The simplicity of  textures and neutral colours is often underestimated. I love the richness of travertine, for instance, and more heavy graphic printed fabrics for upholstery.’ He’s currently working on a renovation for clients who want to turn their Victorian terraced house into a contemporary space with Australian and Turkish influences. spaceshack.co.uk

stephanie barba mendoza

Stephanie Barba Mendoza

‘I take great joy in infusing a home with colour,’ says Mexican designer Stephanie Barba Mendoza who studied interior design in her home country before completing the KLC diploma course in London, and working for Martin Brudnizki. She launched her studio in 2020 and is already making her mark with a maximalist style – think an uplifting riot of patterns, mix of high-low tactile materials and bespoke handcrafted pieces next to vintage finds. ‘From artists who specialise in hand-painted finishes and clay sculptors to papier-mâché makers and glass workers, I find craft immensely inspiring; this type of collaboration adds something wholly unique to our designs.’ For Stephanie, the devil really is in the detail, whether that’s lining a wardrobe in a beautiful fabric, adding a trim to curtains or searching for a special item of furniture from a local gallery. barbamendoza.com

Studio Vero - 50 Finest Interior Designers

Studio Vero

Inseparable friends since they were 13, it was perhaps inevitable that one day Venetia Rudebeck and Romanos Brihi – both avid art collectors – would end up working together. ‘Clients see us as a little more daring than some of our peers and respond positively to our passion and enthusiasm,’ says Romanos, of the studio, which the pair set up in 2014. ‘While we both bring slightly different design elements to the table, our schemes are very coherent: the final result is always colourful, layered and full of surprises. The emphasis on art defines many of our designs, often juxtaposed with interesting antiques or one-off pieces of vintage furniture,’ continues Venetia. Projects are brilliantly varied and include a recently completed duplex apartment in Belgravia with Portuguese tiles and teal lacquered cabinets in the kitchen, soaring hallway murals and an enormous light fixture sourced from a Viennese train station. studio-vero.com

Thorp

Thorp

‘We are always quick to convey to new clients that what we do is so much broader than people might realise,’ says Philippa Thorp of her 360-degree vision which encompasses architecture, interiors and landscape design. ‘It is the entirety of a house within its setting and gardens that ultimately creates a real home. The arrival and the garden set the tone of what’s to come. Levels, trees, planting and scent all play their vital part to modern family life where external rooms provide different places to visit throughout the day. It is the views out from the house that complete it.’ She also emphasises the importance of light and different finishes: ‘balancing textures in a room is essential and so often overlooked.’ Projects now in their final stages of installation include a mountain house in America’s exclusive Yellowstone Club and a large villa on Lake Como. thorp.co.uk

Turner Pocock

Turner Pocock

Bunny Turner and Emma Pocock take a holistic stance to their interiors, always aiming for a strong sense of continuity and calm throughout – no matter the scheme, colour or pattern in question. ‘There is no doubt that flowers and plants are more prevalent in the interiors world than they have been for a while, and these are certainly creeping into our designs,’ says Emma. ‘However, we will always have a natural love for geometrics, as well as a stripe.’ The pair are passionate about joinery (‘it can make or break a project,’ she says) and are working on (among other things) a listed house in Oxfordshire ‘where history is presented to us at every turn. We peeled back painted wallpaper to find original block printed William Morris prints underneath and are trying to reuse old troughs in the boot room as a dog bath.’ turnerpocock.co.uk

Ventura

Ventura

Founded by Arlene McIntyre and named after the coastal Californian city that inspires her, this interior design studio is known for its classic contemporary style. ‘We believe that homes should be more than just comfortable and beautiful; they should be interesting too,’ she says, speaking for her 50-strong team who provide a complete turnkey fit out for all clients. ‘Sitting down and immersing myself in what the space will be used for is instrumental in getting it right.’ That goes for one of her all-time favourite assignments: a 240sq/m penthouse apartment in Ireland with a wraparound balcony and sensational views of the Irish Sea. ‘Those sea views were the starting point for the scheme, for the layout of the rooms and the idea to thread through a Hamptons vibe with a warm, neutral palette that felt tonal and timeless.’ ventura.ie

VSP Interiors

VSP Interiors

‘Essentially my objective is to make my clients’ dreams a reality – even if they don’t quite know what they are or how to achieve them,’ says Henriette von Stockhausen of VSP Interiors, an expert in country houses. She often adds an element of surprise, for instance, a modern painting in an otherwise traditional interior or an unlikely combination of pieces from different periods and places. ‘I recently used a tapestry as wallpaper to cover a vast cavernous entrance hall to wonderful effect; I also put a lot of wallpapers and antique rugs in bathrooms and kitchens which some people find quite unexpected but I feel that these rooms in particular need attention to create a feeling of warmth.’ Her portfolio ranges from an old dairy house on a Dorset estate to a Georgian manor in Oxfordshire and a house influenced by Spanish style in Montecito. vspinteriors.com

Ward & Co

Ward & Co

Mother and daughter duo Sarah and Rosie Ward are passionate about creating perfectly balanced, unique spaces that stand the test of time. ‘We tend to focus on neutral palettes and textures with clean lines and layer these with confident, bold colours; a combination which has great longevity,’ says Sarah. Location and context are also hugely important. For instance, for a recent home in Antigua, ‘we incorporated warm tones synonymous with the sand and sea, adopting a calming neutral base palette, layered with pops of eye-catching artwork,’ she continues. Similarly, for a more rural setting in Suffolk, the beautiful sprawling wisteria on the exterior of the property set the tone for the colour palette within. wardandco.com

Featured image: 2LG Studios

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